LED vs Halogen
6
2.7 years ago by
halan50
halan50 wrote:

 

found this nice comparison of cost of running LED and Halogen bulbs for a year. The savings are huge!! 

http://www.integral-led.com/education/why-led 

halogen led lights cost comparison • 2.9k views
link modified 2.5 years ago by decarbonet ♦♦ 140 • written 2.7 years ago by halan50
1
2.6 years ago by
js200
js200 wrote:
I've recently replaced a room of 10 50W halogens with 4W LEDs. I estimate this will save over £70 a year and pay back in just over 4 months. If the rest of the halogens in the house hadn't already been replaced with LEDs then it would be more like saving £250 a year and a one month payback. I got some twin packs of OSRAM GU10 bulbs on a half-price offer at Robert Dyas for £6.49 the pair. They're warm white and I'm very happy with the colour (2700K, similar to an incandescent lamp). It's hard to tell the difference from the halogens and much better than the bright white LEDs we already have. They're also much lighter because they don't have a big heat-sink like the old ones, which made them easier to install than previously. I hope this means the quality is better and they will last longer. You can get higher wattage bulbs for a little more but these are bright enough. These are the links: www.robertdyas.co.uk/osram-led-35w-gu10-twin-box www.robertdyas.co.uk/osram-led-50w-gu10-twin-box You can use this code at checkout for £5 off if you spend over £25 until the 8th of March: RDBBRM Good if you want 4 packs (8 bulbs) of the 4W models (they say 4W on the box but the bulb reads 3.5W). If you collect from a store then you don't need to pay for delivery and you can still get cashback by going through a site like topcashback.co.uk. You can't dim them and I haven't tried. There are models that you can dim though.
link written 2.6 years ago by js200
0
2.7 years ago by
Patrizia20
Patrizia20 wrote:
It should be considered that it is recommended to change a 50W halogen bulb with a 6.5W LED bulb if you have single-spotlight lighting fixture. Instead, in the case you have multi-spotlights, you can replace the halogen bulbs with lower LEDs (e.g. 3.5W) without noticing a decrement in room brightness. In my case, I replaced four 50W bulbs with 3.5W LEDs in the kitchen and ten 50W bulbs with 2.5 LEDs in the living room. If I had mounted 6.5W in my multi-spot lighting fixture I would have had too much light! Moreover, the brightness of the bulb is measured in Lumens (not Watt), thus this is the right value to check on the energy label if you are concerned about having a dark room.
link written 2.7 years ago by Patrizia20
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2.7 years ago by
Patrizia20
Patrizia20 wrote:
Just some more details on the bulbs I bought: - 3.5W LED bulbs, 300 lumens, 3000 Kelvin (Warm White). This last value determine the colour of the light (yellow, white, or blue depending on your taste). Cost: £11.99 x 5 units on Amazon - 2.5W LED bulbs, 300 lumens, 3000 Kelvin. Cost: £10.99 x 5 units on Amazon.
link written 2.7 years ago by Patrizia20
0
2.7 years ago by
halan50
halan50 wrote:
dain was suggesting this site for buying LEDs: http://www.ledhut.co.uk/spot-lights/gu10-led-bulbs.html I need to make a purchase soon.
link written 2.7 years ago by halan50
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2.6 years ago by
halan50
halan50 wrote:
If anyone is planning on buying LED bulbs, then I suggest you go for "warm white". The light from those are more natural than the standard "white" light bulbs. The type of light is always written on the pack.
link written 2.6 years ago by halan50
0
2.6 years ago by
halan50
halan50 wrote:
Found this site that shows what range of Kelvin gives what sort of colour. Very useful to check before you buy, to make sure you get the colour you want. http://www.integral-led.com/education/warm-white-or-cool-white
link written 2.6 years ago by halan50
0
2.6 years ago by
Patrizia20
Patrizia20 wrote:
Thank you halan, this website is really interesting
link written 2.6 years ago by Patrizia20
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2.6 years ago by
halan50
halan50 wrote:
Good find js. I bought some G9 ones from Amazon by had to return them. They were too white, even though it was meant to be 3000K. So as you mentioned, 2700K are best. I'm now looking around for good priced grey/silver GU5.3s.
link written 2.6 years ago by halan50
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