Reducing the brightness
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2.9 years ago by
decarbonet ♦♦ 140
decarbonet ♦♦ 140 wrote:

If you reduce the monitor brightness from 100% to 70%, you can save up to 20% of the energy the monitor uses.  

- See more at: http://green.harvard.edu/tools-resources/green-tip/reduce-monitor-brightness-reduce-energy#sthash.NEHP8ih8.dpuf

screen office energy • 739 views
link modified 2.1 years ago by js200 • written 2.9 years ago by decarbonet ♦♦ 140
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2.1 years ago by
Laser120
Southampton
Laser120 wrote:

I use an 8 year old Apple 30" monitor (see below). I measured how much energy it is using when in full brightness, and it's 145W per hour. When I lower brightness to 70%, consumption goes down to 98W! which is about 32% less energy. This goes down further to 73W when on 50% brightness, but it looks a bit dim.  70% brightness looks ideal, and would save me about 1.8 kWh a week! 

 

link written 2.1 years ago by Laser120
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2.1 years ago by
js200
js200 wrote:

As usual, it depends. You will need to measure it. The efficiencies involved should be equivalent to the difference between Fluorescent and LED room lighting.

I imagine consumption will be a similar reduction proportionally. However, as the total use is lower to start with, the saving will not be as much in absolute terms.

Have a look at my answer here for more info. I have a few monitors with different back-light tech, but they are different sizes so it's not a fair comparison.

link written 2.1 years ago by js200
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2.9 years ago by
decarbonet ♦♦ 140
decarbonet ♦♦ 140 wrote:
Good point! Most people won't notice much difference in their monitor between 100% and 70% brightness.
link written 2.9 years ago by decarbonet ♦♦ 140
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2.1 years ago by
js200
js200 wrote:

Reducing monitor brightness is a good idea, but less relevant with modern LED back-lighting than with older CCFL (or even CRT) technology. Still worth doing but the savings will be less.

Never use a screensaver! These are irrelevant today and just burn energy. If a screen is not in use then it should be off. If on Windows then you can use a tool such as github.com/ukanth/monitores to turn off screens when you lock the computer (Win+L). You can also use a service such as shutdownscanner.com to monitor how many computers have been left on (this is one of my projects).

link written 2.1 years ago by js200
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2.1 years ago by
Laser120
Southampton
Laser120 wrote:

Hi js, do you know what the energy consumption would be like for LED back-lit monitors, fo 100% and 70% brightness? it would be great to compare.  

link written 2.1 years ago by Laser120
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